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11 Vehicle Cemeteries That Are Way Eerier Than Any Human Graveyard

DECEMBER 10, 2015  —  By Jason Lopez

11 Vehicle Cemeteries That Are Way Eerier Than Any Human Graveyard

11 Vehicle Cemeteries That Are Way Eerier Than Any Human Graveyard

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11 Vehicle Cemeteries That Are Way Eerier Than Any Human Graveyard

Vehicle cemeteries are where hundreds of cars, ships and other types of machinery are left abandoned and exposed to the elements. Most often, it's cheaper to abandon unused and outdated vehicles than to spend the money to properly dispose of them. For many fascinating reasons, these vehicle graveyards are fairly common sights to see across the globe. Here are some of the most eerie graveyards where no actual human remains will be found.

Chittagong Ship Breaking Yard

Chittagong Ship Breaking Yard

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At this expansive ship yard in Bangladesh, hundreds of ships are left to rot and eventually be cultivated for scrap metal. The yard employs thousands of Bangladeshi citizens but is notorious for its unsafe working environment and poor health records (the yard is full of lead, arsenic and toxic mud). One estimate claims that one fifth of the world's discarded ships end up here. The yard is such a desolate and strange sight that they even shot a scene for the "Avengers: Age of Ultron" movie there.

Arizona Bone Yard

Arizona Bone Yard

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Found in the middle of the Arizona desert is one of the largest aircraft storage locations in the world. With more than 4,200 aircrafts (valued at around $35 billion) left out in the desert elements, the Arizona Boneyard has become famous for its eerie sights — you can even take a tour of the grounds!

New York Motorcycle Graveyard

New York Motorcycle Graveyard

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Once upon a time in Lockport, New York, an abandoned warehouse was filled to the brim with old motorcycles. A man only known as Kohl cultivated a huge collection of the vehicles before selling them all in 1997 and passing away in 2002. After that, the warehouse was condemned by the authorities and many of the bikes were sent away to be used for scrap metal and spare parts — but not before photographs of the collection went viral and allowed many motorcycle fans to seek out the collection and buy some antique spare parts.

RAF Folkingham

RAF Folkingham

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RAF Folkingham is a former Royal Air Force station located about 120 miles north of London. It's utilized today to store hundreds of vehicles that are used to source spare parts. Some of the vehicles here date all the way back to the days of World War II — caterpillar bulldozers, fuel bowsers, cranes, tractors lorries and armored vehicles among them. One of the DUKW amphibious vehicles on the site was even used in the D-Day landings.

Chernobyl Vehicle Graveyard

Chernobyl Vehicle Graveyard

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Due to radiation from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster of 1986, many unusable vehicles have been sitting abandoned in huge vehicle graveyards for years. Rassokha is the name of the largest vehicle cemetery found in the Ukraine.

Barry Scrapyard

Barry Scrapyard

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In the year 1955, the British Railways decided to dispose of a large portion of old vehicles they owned. With around 650,000 wagons and 16,000 steam locomotives on the way out, many of the trains were sold to private scrapyards just to get rid of them quickly. One of these small yards was the Woodham Brothers scrapyard in South Wales. Many of the steam locomotives here were left out in the open and eventually became a tourist destination due to its strange sights. Individuals interested in antique steam trains began coming from all over to witness and preserve the vehicles. Many still remain at the scrapyard.

Nouadhibou Abandoned Shipyard

Nouadhibou Abandoned Shipyard

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Nouadhibou is the second-largest city in the very poor country of Mauritania. Although the country is struggling financially, the port of the city is still one of the best places for fishermen in the world. Starting back in the 1980s, local citizens used to leave their unwanted vessels in the shallow area of the bay. Over the course of time, larger ships from all over the world would appear in the dumping grounds, too. The biggest ship found here is the United Malika, which was washed ashore in 2003. The government has said that they're planning to use the abandoned ships to create an artificial reef in farther out waters, but the country has yet to witness any actual action from these talks.

Soviet Submarines On The Kola Peninsula

Soviet Submarines On The Kola Peninsula

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In the northern part of Russia in the Nezametnaya Cove sits abandoned Soviet military submarines from as far back as the early 1970s. The Soviet shipyards didn't actually disassemble old submarines, instead choosing to leave them in the Kola Peninsula.

Chatillon Forest Car Graveyard

Chatillon Forest Car Graveyard

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Although this location was cleared back in 2010, it still merits a spot on this list because of just how spooky it was. This small Belgian town was home to over 500 vehicles covered in the decaying elements. Most believe that the cars originated back to World War II when American soldiers left their cars instead of paying to ship them back to America upon the war's end.

Train Graveyard in Bolivia

Train Graveyard in Bolivia

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The Salar de Uyuni located in the stretch of Andes in Bolivia is the largest salt plain in the world. Over a century ago, a railway network was built to accommodate the growing mining industry. Decades later, though, the railroads became unused after the mining economy collapsed. Abandoned steam trains still exist, sitting out to rot in the sun and heat of the desert.

Oranjemund Diamond Vehicle Scrapyard

Oranjemund Diamond Vehicle Scrapyard

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Oranjemund is a city in Namibia that is the location of one of the biggest earth-moving fleets on the planet. Because the area is so fertile in the production of rare and expensive diamonds, any vehicles that enter the mining compound are legally not allowed to leave. Because of this, rusting vehicles are found throughout the grounds. Vehicles date back as far as the year 1920 and even some World War II tanks can be found there.